Summer Gardening Tips (Pests, Propagation, and Planning)

Summer is in full gear. Which means there is a lot to do in the garden, there always is isn't there? The tomatoes and peppers are beginning to produce and in a couple short weeks should be ready to pick. Here are a few summer gardening tips to help you in your garden. Watch for Pests Always be vigilant in the garden. Pests can appear at any time, some of which will decimate a crop in a few short hours if you aren't observant. Squash vine borers are out. I found one yesterday on a zucchini. The eggs are laid at the base of the plant and when they hatch the larvae burrow into the stem and eat they way up which eventually kills the squash plant. If you see sawdust at the base of your squash cut the stalk and kill the larvae inside. Then cover the base of…

Continue Reading

Why I Let Cilantro Bolt and You Should Too

Cilantro is one of our family's favorite herbs to grow. We use it in cooking various dishes and always include it in our guacamole. In the garden it tends to be very short lived in the heat of the summer. Cilantro is very heat sensitive and will produce flowers very fast when the temperatures get warm. When a plant begins to flower is called bolting but in the case of this herb it's not a bad thing. There are lots of great reasons to let your cilantro bolt. Cilantro produces small tiny clusters of white to pink flowers that are very ornamental. While that might be a great reason in itself to let cilantro flower cilantro also attracts small bees and pollinators to the garden. It's also never bothered by deer or rabbits so it makes a great plant to keep next to garden areas that may have issues with…

Continue Reading

Blossom End Rot and What To Do

When the fruit first begins to form in your vegetable garden you may notice a condition where the blossom ends of the fruit turns brown to black then begins to rot away. This can happen to a number of different vegetable garden producers like tomatoes, squash, peppers, and more. Aptly named "Blossom End Rot", this condition is nothing to be overly concerned about. It's disappointing to see something you've been eagerly awaiting for weeks get seemingly ruined - but it is only temporary! Blossom End Rot on Summer Squash   What Causes Blossom End Rot? Blossom end rot is a calcium deficiency that prevents the proper formation of cells in the fruit. Just like people, plants need nutrients like calcium for proper growth. The calcium deficiency can be cause by a couple things but is usually an issue with too much water not allowing the plant to bring in calcium…

Continue Reading

And the Winner is…

Thank you to all the commenters who left entries into the Troy-Bilt CS4235 Wood Chipper giveaway.  It is a great tool for the garden and I know whoever is the winner will enjoy making mountains of mulch! We had 39 commenters* who left some great descriptions of their gardens.  What I found interesting to read were the very different situations each gardener had. Bamboo groves in need of severe pruning, gardeners stuck on islands, managing wilderness areas, removing invasive plants, and many other situations. I'm sure that everyone who posted a comment could make great use of this woodchipper. Unfortunately I can only give away one. To select the winner I used a random number generator and counted to the corresponding commenter in the order in which the comments were made. The winner must be in the continental United States for shipping reasons. If for any reason the winner cannot…

Continue Reading

How to Build a Raised Multi-Leveled Garden Planter Box

The summer heat is coming and with the heat comes a whole new set of rules for gardening. The warm season vegetables grow great while the cool season plants bolt quickly. What if you want to keep your cool season plantings growing longer into the summer? Is there a way to do that? The answer is yes there is, move to the shade! Many cool season vegetables can still be grown in the summer as succession plantings if given enough shade. They won't last as long as the plants grown in spring but you can still grow and harvest many delicious greens. For my purposes the front porch is a great option. It faces north and receives very little direct sunlight during the day. The light it does receive is mostly in the morning on the east side of the house. While I could have just planted everything in pots…

Continue Reading
Close Menu