Growing Plants from Hardwood Cuttings

I've always been one to enjoy experimenting with plant propagation in the garden. This past weekend, since the weather was so pleasant, I went on  hardwood cutting spree.  Hardwood cuttings are very easy to do. The success rate varies quite a lot depending on the type of plants you are trying to propagate. I took around 40-50 cuttings of 4 types of Japanese maples, red trig dogwood, peach trees, viburnums, and hydrangeas. How to Make Hardwood Cuttings Taking hardwood cuttings is a very simple procedure. Just follow these general steps below and if you have questions just leave a comment in the comment section! When to Take Hardwood Cuttings: Hardwood cuttings should be taken after the plants have gone dormant which usually happens after a hard freeze.  You need a few things to get started: Container, Propagation Medium, Rooting Hormone, Sharp Pruners or Knife, Water, and of course the material…

Continue Reading

5 Easy To Propagate Plants from Cuttings! (The Friday Fives)

One of my greatest gardening pleasures is that of making a new plant, for free!  Well I don't actually do the work the plant does, but knowing how to give the plant the optimum conditions for rooting is important for success!  The plants I'm listing today for The Friday Fives are easy to propagate plants from cuttings.  In case you don't know what a cutting is it's a piece of plant tissue that is removed in order to propagate another plant (Essentially a clone).  Cuttings can be leaves but more often are sections of the stem.  Not every plant propagates easy from cuttings, some are quite challenging, but you can be assured that the plants below are the proverbial "piece of cake!"  Or perhaps I should say "Piece of plant"... 5 Easy To Propagate Plants from Cuttings Sedum! Sedum is one of the easiest plants to propagate.  This most likely…

Continue Reading

Garden Shed Plant Propagation Update

This year was the first year I've been able to house my cuttings in the garden shed. It's been great so far. There's no heat but the plants have been protected from the coldest of the winter lows. Essentially I've moved them 1-2 heat zones south without having to leave my yard. Here's a look at the garden shed plants:Several hydrangeas are sending up new foliage. Hydrangeas are so easy to root - a great beginning propagator plant.The Japanese maples that were grown from seed overwintered very well. I'll keep them inside the shed until I'm sure they can safely survive outside. I'm concerned about late winter and spring frosts.This lilac cutting was either an offshoot of another plant or a cutting. I can't remember which I took the picture of but either way they are all doing fine right now. Lilac suckers can be removed from the mother plant to…

Continue Reading

Rooting Viburnums from Hardwood Cuttings

Around Thanksgiving I took 6 small 4 node cuttings from a single viburnum at my in-law’s house. I don’t know what variety the viburnum but that doesn’t bother me, I can find out when the leaves begin to grow and the flowers start to bloom (which admittedly might be awhile). For now though I’ll just be happy to add six more plants to the garden. Of the six viburnums I rooted five had nice roots starting to emerge from between the bottom two nodes. As you can see in the top picture the cuttings had four nodes that I stuck in sand with two nodes under the sand. The top two nodes and maybe the third node should develop branches and leaves.   I used rooting hormone when I took the cuttings and only used sand for the medium. I kept the cuttings in a warm and humid environment (our…

Continue Reading

Rooting Leaf Cuttings of Sedums

Every now and then there is a plant that will root from the leaves, like Asiatic lilies I wrote about earlier in the year. Sedums are another one of those kinds of plants. Recently I rooted several cuttings of 'Autumn Joy' sedum and another sedum I don't know the name of but bears a resemblance to Sedum seiboldii.  You might ask why would you take leaf cuttings when stem cuttings will work just fine? Good question! The answer is simple you can root many more leaves than you can stems! Since sedums grow fairly quickly (at least these varieties do) there are very few disadvantages to rooting leaf cuttings of sedums. Rob of Our French Garden points out in the comments below that when the sedums are blooming you can take leaf cuttings without losing the blooms. Rooting Leaf Cuttings of Sedums Here's all you have to do to get…

Continue Reading

Crape Myrtle Propagation: Step by Step

This weekend I picked up some cuttings of a red flowering crape myrtle to propagate. I took 6 inch hardwood cuttings that were just beginning to leaf out. Since I didn't have time to treat them right away I left them in a jar of water overnight to stay moist and treated them with rooting hormone the next day. Here's the crape myrtle propagation method step by step. (Of course it can be used for many other plants as well.) Crape Myrtle Propagation 1. Prepare your potting medium. In this case I used sand but a 50/50 mix of sand and peat would work fine. Vermiculite is another good medium to use. 2.Take the cut end of the crape myrtle and dip it into the rooting hormone. I usually just dump a little hormone into a cup then dab the end of the cutting into it. Don't stick your cutting…

Continue Reading

Coleus Cuttings: Are they the Easiest Cuttings You’ll Ever Root?

If coleus (Solenostemon) is not the easiest plant cutting to root, then it must be ranked at the top of the plant propagator's list right next to the willows. It's such a great foliage plant why not make more? How to Propagate Coleus The procedure is simple, just take a cutting with two leaves and some stem (about 2 inches is good), pinch the terminal growth and put it in water. Now here's the really important part, the most critical part, you have to wait for roots to grow. That's it! No rooting hormone is needed. You could get away with sticking the stem in moist potting soil and skip the water treatment altogether but if you're like me, you will want to see the roots before you plant them!   How Long Does it Take for Cuttings to Root? Before too long, in less than a week you'll have…

Continue Reading

Plant Propagation: The Basics of Cuttings

One of the most interesting and rewarding parts of gardening is making new plants. Whether from seed, cuttings, or division it is exciting to watch new plants grow into your landscape. For me I really enjoy taking cuttings. If you have never done a cutting before you should try it. It's not difficult if you accept ahead of time that you will have some failures, but you will also have some successes. It all depends on the type of plant from which the cutting was taken. Plants that sucker naturally tend to be easier to reproduce through cuttings than others. Here is some more on the basics of cuttings:   Here are some advantages to taking cuttings: 1. They become established easier and faster than plants from seed. 2. You are assured of getting the same plant each time. When you plant from seed you may or may not get…

Continue Reading
Close Menu