5 Methods to Propagate Plants!

Here's a topic I'm a huge fan of: PLANT PROPAGATION!  I've talked about it repeatedly and those of you who have followed Growing The Home Garden over the years have seen some of my plant propagation experiments.  I thought for today's Friday Five post I would highlight the various common forms of plant propagation.  I highly encourage those of you who have never tried it before to give it a go.  Some plants are very easy to propagate and nothing can beat getting free plants for your garden! Five Methods to Propagate Plants Seeds!  Seeds are one of the most popular methods of plant propagation around.  Seeds are nature's way of making more plants and sustaining the species through the diversification of genes. Every time a seed is planted there is a chance that there will be some variations in the plant's traits which could make it more adaptable to…

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5 Easy To Propagate Plants from Cuttings! (The Friday Fives)

One of my greatest gardening pleasures is that of making a new plant, for free!  Well I don't actually do the work the plant does, but knowing how to give the plant the optimum conditions for rooting is important for success!  The plants I'm listing today for The Friday Fives are easy to propagate plants from cuttings.  In case you don't know what a cutting is it's a piece of plant tissue that is removed in order to propagate another plant (Essentially a clone).  Cuttings can be leaves but more often are sections of the stem.  Not every plant propagates easy from cuttings, some are quite challenging, but you can be assured that the plants below are the proverbial "piece of cake!"  Or perhaps I should say "Piece of plant"... 5 Easy To Propagate Plants from Cuttings Sedum! Sedum is one of the easiest plants to propagate.  This most likely…

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Garden Shed Plant Propagation Update

This year was the first year I've been able to house my cuttings in the garden shed. It's been great so far. There's no heat but the plants have been protected from the coldest of the winter lows. Essentially I've moved them 1-2 heat zones south without having to leave my yard. Here's a look at the garden shed plants:Several hydrangeas are sending up new foliage. Hydrangeas are so easy to root - a great beginning propagator plant.The Japanese maples that were grown from seed overwintered very well. I'll keep them inside the shed until I'm sure they can safely survive outside. I'm concerned about late winter and spring frosts.This lilac cutting was either an offshoot of another plant or a cutting. I can't remember which I took the picture of but either way they are all doing fine right now. Lilac suckers can be removed from the mother plant to…

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Garden Shed February Update

It's been a long while since I've mentioned anything about the goings on in my garden shed world. This should take too long, after all it is February, not much is growing, and it's a small world afterall! Let's dig right in and look to see how things have overwintered!Right now I'm using my shed as a holding area to help shelter my propagated plants. I don't have it heated and I'm not sure that I will - or if I do it won't be much. It stays 10-15 degrees warmer than the outside temperatures on the coldest nights which will allows me to cheat a zone or two with my plants.  Once my vegetable starts get far enough along I'll place them in the shed to harden them off and keep the spring frosts from bipping them. (Bipping is the technical term for when something gets hammered by frosts…

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Hydrangea Propagation (Hydrangea macrophylla)

Everyone likes a hydrangea in the garden. And everyone likes having more hydrangeas! So why not propagate a few more hydrangeas? Of course you have to have a suitable spot for one but if you have a garden location with dappled morning sun and afternoon shade you have the perfect home to plant a hydrangea. But this post isn't about planting a hydrangea, it's about making more hydrangeas through cuttings. Hydrangeas are one of the easiest shrubs you can propagate. It is possible to root hydrangeas through water but I don't recommend using the water method for hydrangeas. I like using a propagation medium like sand or sand/peat for most of my cuttings. What you use is up to you and will probably work fine. Hydrangea macrophylla Cutting   How to Propagate a Hydrangea: Hydrangea rooting Whenever you try to root cuttings make sure that your cutting tools are clean.…

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Propagate Rosemary in Water (The Herbs)

Rosemary is an herb we use frequently in our cooking, at least when we have it around. In years past I've been able to walk out the front door and cut a few sprigs off the large rosemary bushes in front of our steps. Unfortunately that isn't the case anymore. My two main rosemary plants both died due to the extremely cold and extremely long winter we had. They had been in place for about three years and I really liked them as a landscape element as well as a culinary one. But when you are working with living things they can't last forever. Fortunately rosemary is very easy to propagate in water which means that my two plantings in the front will hopefully be replaced very soon. Why Propagate More Rosemary Plants? One of my planting strategies is to make several cuttings and put them in different areas. Every…

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Coral Red Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens)

Coral Red honeysuckle or Lonicera sempervirens is the honeysuckle you want - I mean really want- not the other kind. You probably have honeysuckle somewhere near you right now. It's white, smells pretty good, and it may even be right behind you as you read this, don't look! It knows you are there, it's waiting to spread and take over everything when you aren't looking - or even when you are it really doesn't matter! That honeysuckle that fills the air with it's heady fragrance isn't from around here. It's an overseas immigrant (from Asia) who is naturalizing itself and pushing out it's American cousin Lonicera sempervirens. Don't encourage the foreign invader, instead plant the native honeysuckle! The only thing it lacks is the fragrance of the foreign flower. Hummingbirds love coral red honeysuckle, it looks great, it's very tame, and isn't hard to propagate if you want more. Don't…

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How To Propagate Salvia from Cuttings

Salvia is one of my favorite perennials to propagate and spring is the best time to do it from stem tip cuttings. Pretty soon our gardens will be filled with salvia blooms and you'll see why I like them so much. I'll post a picture at the bottom of this post if you're curious! The salvia in question for today's post is a cultivar of Salvia nemorosa called 'East Friesland'. The method of propagation I'll show you is one that should work on many salvias and probably quite a few other perennials as well.   How to Propagate Salvia Cuttings: First I locate an ideal stem for cutting. This particular stem has three nodes - one apical bud (at the stem tip), and two other nodes. I've done stem tip cuttings of salvia with only two nodes before so it will work but three will result in a larger plant…

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How I’ll Use My Greenhouse

I've been thinking about how I'm going to use my greenhouse lately. There's just enough complete on the greenhouse construction to tantalize my imagination and since people use greenhouse in so many ways that the options are virtually limitless.I don't grow orchids or many tropical plants which means the greenhouse won't be used for them. It's not ready to use yet so seed starting this year isn't an option. Some people like to grow vegetables in their greenhouses to keep fresh veggies growing year round. I like that idea and it might be something to experiment with in the fall assuming I can put together some sort of heating system. Spinach, lettuce and chard might do fine without heat but any summer loving vegetables just won't work. For right now though I'm planning to use it for two things: 1) A Storage Shed and 2) To Propagate plants.As a Storage…

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Rooting Viburnums from Hardwood Cuttings

Around Thanksgiving I took 6 small 4 node cuttings from a single viburnum at my in-law’s house. I don’t know what variety the viburnum but that doesn’t bother me, I can find out when the leaves begin to grow and the flowers start to bloom (which admittedly might be awhile). For now though I’ll just be happy to add six more plants to the garden. Of the six viburnums I rooted five had nice roots starting to emerge from between the bottom two nodes. As you can see in the top picture the cuttings had four nodes that I stuck in sand with two nodes under the sand. The top two nodes and maybe the third node should develop branches and leaves.   I used rooting hormone when I took the cuttings and only used sand for the medium. I kept the cuttings in a warm and humid environment (our…

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