Rooting Leaf Cuttings of Sedums

Every now and then there is a plant that will root from the leaves, like Asiatic lilies I wrote about earlier in the year. Sedums are another one of those kinds of plants. Recently I rooted several cuttings of 'Autumn Joy' sedum and another sedum I don't know the name of but bears a resemblance to Sedum seiboldii.  You might ask why would you take leaf cuttings when stem cuttings will work just fine? Good question! The answer is simple you can root many more leaves than you can stems! Since sedums grow fairly quickly (at least these varieties do) there are very few disadvantages to rooting leaf cuttings of sedums. Rob of Our French Garden points out in the comments below that when the sedums are blooming you can take leaf cuttings without losing the blooms. Rooting Leaf Cuttings of Sedums Here's all you have to do to get…

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Crape Myrtle Propagation: Step by Step

This weekend I picked up some cuttings of a red flowering crape myrtle to propagate. I took 6 inch hardwood cuttings that were just beginning to leaf out. Since I didn't have time to treat them right away I left them in a jar of water overnight to stay moist and treated them with rooting hormone the next day. Here's the crape myrtle propagation method step by step. (Of course it can be used for many other plants as well.) Crape Myrtle Propagation 1. Prepare your potting medium. In this case I used sand but a 50/50 mix of sand and peat would work fine. Vermiculite is another good medium to use. 2.Take the cut end of the crape myrtle and dip it into the rooting hormone. I usually just dump a little hormone into a cup then dab the end of the cutting into it. Don't stick your cutting…

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Yew Propagation (Taxus x media ‘Densiformis’)

Just recently I checked some cuttings of Densiformis Yew (Taxus x media; also Taxus cuspidata) and found roots! Densiformis Yew is also known as a spreading yew and is a common evergreen shrub in landscape plantings. It makes an attractive foundation planting with its dark green needles. If you have animals fond of chewing on plants avoid planting yews since they are very poisonous. How to Propagate Yew Several weeks ago I took five greenwood cuttings from the yews in the front sidewalk bed. I bought the yews in our first year here from the discount rack for $2 a piece. They had some browning branches at the time but a little trimming was all that was needed to correct that. Since then they've grown fairly rapidly providing me with plenty of good branches for propagating. I took greenwood cuttings about 5-6 inches long and treated them with rooting hormone…

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Propagating Oak Leaf Hydrangea through Cuttings

A few weeks ago I took a lone cutting from an Oak Leaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia). I've read where they are difficult to root but I thought I'd give it a try anyway. It was a stem tip cutting with two leaves and a length of about 3 inches. I dipped the cut in in rooting hormone and stuck the cutting in moist sand. I checked the cutting periodically and watched as the cut end began to swell which is where the new roots were beginning to form. Then in six weeks I gently pulled on the little hydrangea and met resistance. I carefully removed the sand from the base of the cutting and found roots! I find that it helps to add enough water to the sand to make the sand soggy make the roots easier to lift. It was a cutting no more, but a new future shrub…

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Coleus Cuttings: Are they the Easiest Cuttings You’ll Ever Root?

If coleus (Solenostemon) is not the easiest plant cutting to root, then it must be ranked at the top of the plant propagator's list right next to the willows. It's such a great foliage plant why not make more? How to Propagate Coleus The procedure is simple, just take a cutting with two leaves and some stem (about 2 inches is good), pinch the terminal growth and put it in water. Now here's the really important part, the most critical part, you have to wait for roots to grow. That's it! No rooting hormone is needed. You could get away with sticking the stem in moist potting soil and skip the water treatment altogether but if you're like me, you will want to see the roots before you plant them!   How Long Does it Take for Cuttings to Root? Before too long, in less than a week you'll have…

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Japanese Dappled Willow (Salix integra) Revisited

Several weeks ago I wrote a post about one of my favorite shrubs, the Japanese Dappled Willow 'Hakuro Nishiki' (Salix integra). It's a fast growing variegated willow that works well as a privacy screen and is hardy in zones 4-9. It's deciduous so it will be bare over the winter but the new growth in the spring time is fun to look at. It pops out with reddish tints on the tips of the leaves that eventually fade to a white and green "dappled" coloration. Propagating a Dappled Willow is Very Easy I have a row of these plants along one side of our property, but I didn't buy a single one. They all came from cuttings of the dappled willow in the picture above. My in-laws bought a few of these several years ago and this one at the edge of their patio has really enjoyed its location. With…

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Russian Sage Cuttings (Plant Propagation Update)

Yesterday I potted up the Russian sage cuttings (Perovskia atriplicifolia). I took nine cuttings a couple weeks ago and placed them in sand after putting some rooting hormone on the cut end. In less than two weeks we have roots! You can see the root system in the picture below. The roots come out from the sides of the stem and not just the cut end. All nine of the Russian sage cuttings rooted. Once the cuttings root you want to get them into a potting mix so that the nutrients in the soil will help feed the plant. If I were to leave them too long in the sand medium I use for cuttings the new plants would fail. Here they are potted up next to some vinca minor. (Don't worry I have a special place or this vinca.) These cuttings are now in a morning sun only location…

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Propagating Perennials: Russian Sage, Salvia, and Coneflower

Spring is a great time for what? PERENNIAL PLANT PROPAGATION! OK, I get excited about making new plants and I wanted to share a little of what I've been working on in the garden. Spring really is a great time to take cuttings of your perennials, in fact it might be the best time. If you have never tried propagating a plant perennials are a great place to start. They root very fast and will give you an instant sense of satisfaction of doing something amazing! If you would like to read up on how to propagate plants through cuttings take a look at one of my previous posts: The Basics of Cuttings. Here's what I've been working on: Propagate Salvia nemorosa ('Caradonna' and East Friesland') About a week or so ago I took cuttings of two kinds of Salvia nemorosa, 'Caradonna' and 'East Freisland'. I took internodal cuttings (which…

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Plant Propagation: The Basics of Cuttings

One of the most interesting and rewarding parts of gardening is making new plants. Whether from seed, cuttings, or division it is exciting to watch new plants grow into your landscape. For me I really enjoy taking cuttings. If you have never done a cutting before you should try it. It's not difficult if you accept ahead of time that you will have some failures, but you will also have some successes. It all depends on the type of plant from which the cutting was taken. Plants that sucker naturally tend to be easier to reproduce through cuttings than others. Here is some more on the basics of cuttings:   Here are some advantages to taking cuttings: 1. They become established easier and faster than plants from seed. 2. You are assured of getting the same plant each time. When you plant from seed you may or may not get…

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Red Twig Dogwood Propagation (Cornus stolonifera)

This week I was excited to find that something I had given up for lost actually worked. I took some cuttings in an attempt to propagate Red Twig Dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) back in the fall. After I prepared the cuttings they sat for several weeks without anything happening. Just after I transplanted my butterfly bush cuttings (Adventures on a Warm Winter Day!) I thought I would try to bring in a few more cuttings from outside and the dogwoods were the main candidates. I had been keeping them in the garage near a window so I figured that bringing them inside into the warmth might hasten the rooting process. I re-stuck the dogwoods into the same pot I used for the rooted butterfly bush cuttings then brought them inside. My hope for the little dogwoods turned out to be well founded. Two of them are leafing out and two others…

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