Hydrangea Propagation (Natural Layering)

Hydrangeas are fantastic garden plants! The flowers are beautiful but even when not in bloom hydrangeas can be a well formed shrub in the garden. Yesterday while walking through the garden I found a hydrangea that had rooted itself on the ground. This is called layering. Layering is a method of plant propagation where you can encourage roots roots to form. You can encourage layering but many plants will do this naturally on their own with a low hanging branch. Below is a little information on hydrangea propagation through layering. Hydrangea Propagation through Layering To layer a hydrangea branch simply take a low hanging branch and make sure a node makes contact with the soil. Then pin it with a rock or other heavy object. In a few weeks you can come back to check it and see if roots have emerged. Once they have take the hydrangea branch and…

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Oak Leaf Hydrangea – Garden Favorites

Over the years I have grown many plants. I have a bit of a collectors attitude toward my garden and pick out unique plants as much as possible. Some of those plants haven't done well for me, but other plants have simply been amazing. I thought it would be a good idea to go back and look at some of those plants that have been consistently good garden plants. Today I'm starting with the oak leaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia). The oak leaf hydrangea is an amazing plant that can tolerate shade to part sun here in Tennessee. The botanical name Hydrangea quercifolia when broken down describes the oak leaf hydrangea perfectly. The first word is obviously hydrangea which is classifying the plant in that family. "Quercus" is the oak family and "folia" means "leaf". Together they make quercifolia which would mean oak leaf and reflects the shape of the leaf.…

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Growing Plants from Hardwood Cuttings

I've always been one to enjoy experimenting with plant propagation in the garden. This past weekend, since the weather was so pleasant, I went on  hardwood cutting spree.  Hardwood cuttings are very easy to do. The success rate varies quite a lot depending on the type of plants you are trying to propagate. I took around 40-50 cuttings of 4 types of Japanese maples, red trig dogwood, peach trees, viburnums, and hydrangeas. How to Make Hardwood Cuttings Taking hardwood cuttings is a very simple procedure. Just follow these general steps below and if you have questions just leave a comment in the comment section! When to Take Hardwood Cuttings: Hardwood cuttings should be taken after the plants have gone dormant which usually happens after a hard freeze.  You need a few things to get started: Container, Propagation Medium, Rooting Hormone, Sharp Pruners or Knife, Water, and of course the material…

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5 Shrubs to Propagate in Late Fall or Winter (Hardwood Cuttings)

We're entering the middle of November which means not only is that turkey get closer to being roasted but it's also time for hardwood cuttings!  There are quite a few plants that will easily grow from hardwood cuttings and are well worth trying for any budget minded gardener.  Free plants are always a good thing right?  Well unless they're weeds...  Anyway today we'll look at a few shrubs you can easily make more of over the winter that have high chances of success.  That's not to say you will be 100% successful but these shrubs are typically very easy to root. First though what are hardwood cuttings?  Hardwood cuttings are taken from branches that have had some time to develop a brown outer coating on the bark.  The branches have gone dormant and have dropped their leaves which allows them to focus all their energy on root development.  With hardwood…

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Hydrangea Propagation (Hydrangea macrophylla)

Everyone likes a hydrangea in the garden. And everyone likes having more hydrangeas! So why not propagate a few more hydrangeas? Of course you have to have a suitable spot for one but if you have a garden location with dappled morning sun and afternoon shade you have the perfect home to plant a hydrangea. But this post isn't about planting a hydrangea, it's about making more hydrangeas through cuttings. Hydrangeas are one of the easiest shrubs you can propagate. It is possible to root hydrangeas through water but I don't recommend using the water method for hydrangeas. I like using a propagation medium like sand or sand/peat for most of my cuttings. What you use is up to you and will probably work fine. Hydrangea macrophylla Cutting   How to Propagate a Hydrangea: Hydrangea rooting Whenever you try to root cuttings make sure that your cutting tools are clean.…

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Yew Propagation (Taxus x media ‘Densiformis’)

Just recently I checked some cuttings of Densiformis Yew (Taxus x media; also Taxus cuspidata) and found roots! Densiformis Yew is also known as a spreading yew and is a common evergreen shrub in landscape plantings. It makes an attractive foundation planting with its dark green needles. If you have animals fond of chewing on plants avoid planting yews since they are very poisonous. How to Propagate Yew Several weeks ago I took five greenwood cuttings from the yews in the front sidewalk bed. I bought the yews in our first year here from the discount rack for $2 a piece. They had some browning branches at the time but a little trimming was all that was needed to correct that. Since then they've grown fairly rapidly providing me with plenty of good branches for propagating. I took greenwood cuttings about 5-6 inches long and treated them with rooting hormone…

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Propagating Oak Leaf Hydrangea through Cuttings

A few weeks ago I took a lone cutting from an Oak Leaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia). I've read where they are difficult to root but I thought I'd give it a try anyway. It was a stem tip cutting with two leaves and a length of about 3 inches. I dipped the cut in in rooting hormone and stuck the cutting in moist sand. I checked the cutting periodically and watched as the cut end began to swell which is where the new roots were beginning to form. Then in six weeks I gently pulled on the little hydrangea and met resistance. I carefully removed the sand from the base of the cutting and found roots! I find that it helps to add enough water to the sand to make the sand soggy make the roots easier to lift. It was a cutting no more, but a new future shrub…

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Japanese Dappled Willow (Salix integra) Revisited

Several weeks ago I wrote a post about one of my favorite shrubs, the Japanese Dappled Willow 'Hakuro Nishiki' (Salix integra). It's a fast growing variegated willow that works well as a privacy screen and is hardy in zones 4-9. It's deciduous so it will be bare over the winter but the new growth in the spring time is fun to look at. It pops out with reddish tints on the tips of the leaves that eventually fade to a white and green "dappled" coloration. Propagating a Dappled Willow is Very Easy I have a row of these plants along one side of our property, but I didn't buy a single one. They all came from cuttings of the dappled willow in the picture above. My in-laws bought a few of these several years ago and this one at the edge of their patio has really enjoyed its location. With…

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Red Twig Dogwood Propagation (Cornus stolonifera)

This week I was excited to find that something I had given up for lost actually worked. I took some cuttings in an attempt to propagate Red Twig Dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) back in the fall. After I prepared the cuttings they sat for several weeks without anything happening. Just after I transplanted my butterfly bush cuttings (Adventures on a Warm Winter Day!) I thought I would try to bring in a few more cuttings from outside and the dogwoods were the main candidates. I had been keeping them in the garage near a window so I figured that bringing them inside into the warmth might hasten the rooting process. I re-stuck the dogwoods into the same pot I used for the rooted butterfly bush cuttings then brought them inside. My hope for the little dogwoods turned out to be well founded. Two of them are leafing out and two others…

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