Hydrangea Propagation (Natural Layering)

Hydrangeas are fantastic garden plants! The flowers are beautiful but even when not in bloom hydrangeas can be a well formed shrub in the garden. Yesterday while walking through the garden I found a hydrangea that had rooted itself on the ground. This is called layering. Layering is a method of plant propagation where you can encourage roots roots to form. You can encourage layering but many plants will do this naturally on their own with a low hanging branch. Below is a little information on hydrangea propagation through layering. Hydrangea Propagation through Layering To layer a hydrangea branch simply take a low hanging branch and make sure a node makes contact with the soil. Then pin it with a rock or other heavy object. In a few weeks you can come back to check it and see if roots have emerged. Once they have take the hydrangea branch and…

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Oak Leaf Hydrangea – Garden Favorites

Over the years I have grown many plants. I have a bit of a collectors attitude toward my garden and pick out unique plants as much as possible. Some of those plants haven't done well for me, but other plants have simply been amazing. I thought it would be a good idea to go back and look at some of those plants that have been consistently good garden plants. Today I'm starting with the oak leaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia). The oak leaf hydrangea is an amazing plant that can tolerate shade to part sun here in Tennessee. The botanical name Hydrangea quercifolia when broken down describes the oak leaf hydrangea perfectly. The first word is obviously hydrangea which is classifying the plant in that family. "Quercus" is the oak family and "folia" means "leaf". Together they make quercifolia which would mean oak leaf and reflects the shape of the leaf.…

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Growing Plants from Hardwood Cuttings

I've always been one to enjoy experimenting with plant propagation in the garden. This past weekend, since the weather was so pleasant, I went on  hardwood cutting spree.  Hardwood cuttings are very easy to do. The success rate varies quite a lot depending on the type of plants you are trying to propagate. I took around 40-50 cuttings of 4 types of Japanese maples, red trig dogwood, peach trees, viburnums, and hydrangeas. How to Make Hardwood Cuttings Taking hardwood cuttings is a very simple procedure. Just follow these general steps below and if you have questions just leave a comment in the comment section! When to Take Hardwood Cuttings: Hardwood cuttings should be taken after the plants have gone dormant which usually happens after a hard freeze.  You need a few things to get started: Container, Propagation Medium, Rooting Hormone, Sharp Pruners or Knife, Water, and of course the material…

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Hydrangea Propagation (Hydrangea macrophylla)

Everyone likes a hydrangea in the garden. And everyone likes having more hydrangeas! So why not propagate a few more hydrangeas? Of course you have to have a suitable spot for one but if you have a garden location with dappled morning sun and afternoon shade you have the perfect home to plant a hydrangea. But this post isn't about planting a hydrangea, it's about making more hydrangeas through cuttings. Hydrangeas are one of the easiest shrubs you can propagate. It is possible to root hydrangeas through water but I don't recommend using the water method for hydrangeas. I like using a propagation medium like sand or sand/peat for most of my cuttings. What you use is up to you and will probably work fine. Hydrangea macrophylla Cutting   How to Propagate a Hydrangea: Hydrangea rooting Whenever you try to root cuttings make sure that your cutting tools are clean.…

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Propagating Oak Leaf Hydrangea through Cuttings

A few weeks ago I took a lone cutting from an Oak Leaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia). I've read where they are difficult to root but I thought I'd give it a try anyway. It was a stem tip cutting with two leaves and a length of about 3 inches. I dipped the cut in in rooting hormone and stuck the cutting in moist sand. I checked the cutting periodically and watched as the cut end began to swell which is where the new roots were beginning to form. Then in six weeks I gently pulled on the little hydrangea and met resistance. I carefully removed the sand from the base of the cutting and found roots! I find that it helps to add enough water to the sand to make the sand soggy make the roots easier to lift. It was a cutting no more, but a new future shrub…

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