A Simple and Quick to Assemble Compost Bin

We all know about compost.  It's important, perhaps the most important thing we do as gardeners for our plants.  Organic matter is critical for plants to get nutrients.  It's also extremely helpful as a waste disposal system.  Rather than throw away your biodegradable wastes from the kitchen you can compost it and use it later for the garden.  Composting makes a lot of sense. There can be a lot of options when making a compost bin.  You can go cheap and just make a pile in a corner of your yard, you can go fancy with a dual rotating bin composter, or you can go somewhere in between which is where I'm going for today's post. All my materials for this bin were furnished by Lowe's Creative Ideas (Blogger Network). The compost bins I put together were very easy to assemble and look pretty nice too.  I found some metal…

Continue Reading

5 Ways to Save Money on the Garden!

We're always looking for ways to save money and with today's economy what it is it's not just wise, it's crucial for gardeners to save a buck when they can!  Gaillardia from a Discount Rack There are several ways gardeners can save money on their garden that are really easy to do and don't require anything really crazy.  Today's Friday Five post offers up 5 tips to help you save money on your garden.  Don't forget to share your favorite ways to save money on gardening in the comments below!  5 Ways to Save Money on the Garden!  Let's start with an important one that I mention often - compost!  Compost is composed of a humongous number of living organisms that bring life to the soil.  They break down big stuff and make it into small stuff that plants can use.  What is that stuff?  Nutrients and elements that range…

Continue Reading

5 Easy Ways to Be Organic!

I think in many ways people who garden in the "traditional" or "conventional" methods* don't realize how easy it really can be to garden organically. In fact some of these organic ideas are probably done by everyone who gardens in some capacity. For this Friday's Friday Five let's take a look at 5 easy ways to be organic.  There are many more ways but these five are good to get your started! 5 Easy Ways to Be Organic Feed the soil with compost!  Whether your purchase your compost or make it yourself, compost is one of the best things you can add to your soil.  It boosts the retention of moisture, improves drainage in clay soils, adds nutrients, and puts beneficial microbes into the soil.  Compost won't burn your plants and makes the soil easier for plants to grow a string root system.  You can't go wrong with compost! Ditch…

Continue Reading

TARP for Gardening

No I'm not referring to the stimulus package here. I'm talking about what possibly could be the most handy tool you ever use for spring gardening - the tarp. As my gardens have grown over the last several years I've added many more plants. As all gardeners know with more plants comes more responsibility and more work when spring cleanup comes. All dead growth needs cleaned up, pruned out, and disposed of in a good location - ideally the compost bin. Sadly my wheelbarrow just isn't up to the task. It would work in a pinch but would require multiple trips back and forth to the compost bin.  The tarp is the simple and easy solution that saves the day! That one 6'x8' piece of plastic came in very handy to haul all the garden debris to the back yard for composting, and in one trip. In this case I…

Continue Reading

Random December Gardening

Today I did a few garden related things just to get outside - nothing major - nothing terribly exciting. Just a few little things as an excuse to breathe some fresh (and rather cold) air. The weather forecast calls for snow flurries over night but little or no accumulation - at least in our area. Butterfly Bush Cuttings I took about 20 cuttings from one of our butterfly bushes. It's the one in the birdbath garden and was admired by my garden club when we met at my house in the summer. Of all the plants in my garden that I find fascinating the red twig dogwoods, the 'Powis Castle' artemisia, the salvias, the gaillardia the one that received the most comments was the butterfly bush! I gave away many cuttings that day but no one has reported back to me that any lived. I figured I would root some…

Continue Reading

My Simple Compost Solution

You can go out and spend all kinds of money for a fancy compost bin but sometimes a simple solution can work just as well. In the interest of full disclosure, I am a lazy composter. There I said it. I don't get out there to the bin to turn it regularly. I don't check it with a fancy compost thermometer to make sure the temperature is ideal. I don't add special compost ingredients designed to speed along the process. I probably should but I don't. I suspect if I did I would have a lot more finished compost available for my gardens. But as I said, I'm a lazy composter. I'm also a cheap composter. My big bin is a group of 4 pallets screwed together. Three pallets are actually attached and the fourth I use as a loose barrier that I move out of the way on the…

Continue Reading

Green Gardening for St. Patrick’s Day

We are told all the time about what you can do to be "greener." Things ranging from changing the light bulbs in your home to setting the heat back a few degrees are common tips we hear but what about in the garden?  There are several things we can do to enhance our environmental "greenness" in the garden and here's a few suggestions on being "greener" for St. Patrick's Day and everyday thereafter! Go native. Native plants are used to the climate and don't need extra watering or extreme amounts of care like some non-native plants. In general since there is a natural balance already established in the wild damage from any possible escape from cultivation by seed dispersalis minimal. Reuse materials. If something can be used again in another way or washed and reused it prevents it from going to the landfill. Things like plastic nursery pots, yogurt cups(see…

Continue Reading

Making the Worm Bin Part 1

Part of my worm bin composter is finished.  This really is a very simple project that anyone can do at home.  To complete this part of the composter it only took about 30 minutes which also included the time to gather the materials and to put them away.  Since the weather outside this week is terribly cold this makes a good indoor project to help ease that gardening itch. I found the basic idea at the Washington State University Extension service.  Their site demonstrates a two tray compost bin but if you look the commercially available worm compostering systems have 3-5 expandable sections.  I decided to start small and I prepared three plastic containers. The total cost of these was around $15-$18.  Your cost may vary due to your local taxes, our sales tax in TN is higher than most. I followed the instructions and used a 1/4 inch bit…

Continue Reading

What Do These Things Have in Common?

What do Obama, McCain, the Nashville Predators, recipes, a 2002 Chevy, and the Williamson County Honor Roll have in common? Well it's not politics if you can believe it!  While I have definite political opinions, I wish to stay non-partisan on this blog and will have to tell both Obama and McCain that they will now become dirt, or really compost!  What am I talking about?  Newspapers! Change is definitely coming thanks to bacteria and beneficial microbes as they eventually break down our old newspapers. And to those who made the honor roll, congratulations you did a great job, but now its time to make yourself useful in the garden. As for the Chevy, the Predators and the various recipes we have no use for they will join the myriad of published stories that will help our garden grow! Putting shredded newspaper in the compost bin is just one neat…

Continue Reading

Today in the Garden

Today in the garden I spent a good deal of time cleaning up and clearing out the old vegetables of the 2008 season. The tomatoes are gone as are the cucumbers, squash, and beans. The cantaloupe stopped producing weeks ago and surprisingly the watermelon gave us one more last week before its demise. It wasn't much of a watermelon but it was a tasty surprise.  Everything has an end, or does it? The leftovers of this season have now been placed into the new compost bin. It's not exactly new, as it has been fashioned form three old wooden palettes, but it is our newest garden addition. New to us! I put a picture of the palettes in this post but I haven't taken one since it was completed.  Into the new bin went all the collections from the garden plus those annuals that have faded already due to the…

Continue Reading
  • 1
  • 2
Close Menu