Crossing Daylilies

Daylilies are one of the easiest plants to learn how to hybridize. The large flowers with easy to get to pollen make it a simple matter to transfer pollen from one flower to another.  There are a couple simple things you need to know before you start hybridizing daylilies. The first is where the pollen is and the second is where to place it!Important Daylily Parts for HybridizingThe two parts of the daylily flower you need to pay attention to are the stigma and the stamen. The stamens are 6 stalk like parts that emerge from the flower. On the end of each stamen is the anther which is where you can find the pollen. It's easy to see if you are doing this in the morning. In the afternoon I have noticed they tend to close and make the pollen harder to get to so the morning is the…

Continue Reading

Homemade Plant Tags for Hybridizing Plants

Last year I began to experiment with hybridizing.  I'm hoping that the plants I cross together result in something really nice but it takes a few years to get something from the crosses.  So far I've experimented with daylilies, echinacea, and irises.  Hostas are on my list but the deer keep getting to the flowers before they've had a chance to produce seed.  One of the issues I've run across is labeling.  It's very easy to get mixed up on your crosses.  I came up with an idea recently to make my own plant tags/labels that I can put on each crossed flower.  Here's what I did: The plant label is made from a plastic plant tag I cut into a 2 inch rectangle.  I punched a hole in it with a standard hole puncher and added a bit of garden twine to hang it on the plant.  If you…

Continue Reading

An Interesting Zinnia

The other day I was taking the camera out for a walk.  We do that often around here.  Just my camera and me wandering through the garden.  Gazing at flowers, bugs, butterflies, and anything else of interest.  I think you know this already - but I take a lot of pictures!  I stopped by to examine a zinnia intending to take a picture of it to highlight the flower parts for a possible post on hybridization.  I never did any actual hybridization on the zinnia but I did notice something I though was very interesting on this zinnia.  If you take a look in the picture below, pay close attention to the petals. As you get closer to the center of the flower the petals turn a purple color making the zinnia have bi-colored petals! The coloring is very faint but it gives the zinnia an effervescent look in the sunlight.  Looking for…

Continue Reading

Two More Daylilies!

Yesterday I brought home two more daylilies to add to our daylily collection.  Please welcome 'Serena Sunrise' and 'Custard Candy' to the garden! 'Serena Sunrise' Daylily Both of these daylilies have already been crossed with each other (yesterday) and with my favorite daylily 'Primal Scream' (today)!  I can't wait to see the results, but wait I must! 'Candy Custard' Daylily Both of these daylilies are going to be a part of this month's Lowe's Creative Ideas project which involves planting an edible garden area that is also ornamental.  Daylilies are well known for having edible flowers and when mixed in with more traditional edibles should look fantastic!  For May I put together a vertical garden that uses gutters as planters.

Continue Reading

Our Daylilies of 2012

It's nearly summer which means that it's time for the daylilies to be showing off their flowers. Daylilies aren't native plants by any means but they do really well here in Tennessee.  They have very few problems and tend to grow nearly untended!  I'm sure that combining their low maintenance attribute with their beauty is why they have become so popular. They are definitely not deer resistant and may need protection from deer if the daylilies are planted in a deer prone area, although I don't think we've had the deer eat any of our daylilies yet.  Daylilies get their name from the blooms that open and flower for just a day.  Despite this they can be blooming for several weeks during the summer due to multiple scapes (flower stems) and multiple flowers on those scapes!  I'm getting into daylily hybridizing this year in a more serious way (which means…

Continue Reading

Daylily Hybridizing: My First Attempt

I am a self-professed plant propagation nut and therefore I find plant propagation in all it's forms very interesting. It was inevitable that I'd try my hand at hybridizing and what better place to start than daylilies? Daylilies have easy to find and manipulate reproductive parts (stamens and pistols). The stamen is the male part that contains the pollen and the pistol is where the seeds are formed.The first step to pollination is to select the flowers to hybridize. In this case I picked an orange daylily and a red one. I chose the red daylily to be the parent plant that will form the seeds, which means I needed to take a stamen from the orange daylily. The stamens are very easy to find, there are about six of them around a single pistol. I picked one stamen and brought it to the red daylily then coated its pistol…

Continue Reading
Close Menu