Plants to Propagate in Winter

Winter is officially here! If you're reading this post you are probably thinking what I can do in the garden in winter? Well if you're a fan of plant propagation you should try some winter plant propagation! What plants you can propagate and at what time of the year largely depends on the type of wood you select for the cuttings. At this time of year we are looking at hardwood cuttings which can be taken from a number of different types of plants. Below is a list of a few plants to propagate in winter. Plants to Propagate in Winter Arborvitae Caryopteris Crape Myrtle Dogwood (Cornus) Forsythia Fruit Trees (Peaches, Plums, and many others) Grape Vines Roses Russian Sage (Perennial/sub-shrub) Viburnum Willow Yew This list is not extensive! In general try hardwood cuttings from deciduous plants in the winter. My thought is if you are intending to prune something,…

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Hydrangea Propagation (Natural Layering)

Hydrangeas are fantastic garden plants! The flowers are beautiful but even when not in bloom hydrangeas can be a well formed shrub in the garden. Yesterday while walking through the garden I found a hydrangea that had rooted itself on the ground. This is called layering. Layering is a method of plant propagation where you can encourage roots roots to form. You can encourage layering but many plants will do this naturally on their own with a low hanging branch. Below is a little information on hydrangea propagation through layering. Hydrangea Propagation through Layering To layer a hydrangea branch simply take a low hanging branch and make sure a node makes contact with the soil. Then pin it with a rock or other heavy object. In a few weeks you can come back to check it and see if roots have emerged. Once they have take the hydrangea branch and…

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Plant Propagation Cloner

I came across a video today on Youtube that I thought was a fantastic demonstration of how to build a plant propagation cloner! This is a DIY project I would love to try when I have a bit more time. If you have tried something like this please let us know in the comments on how the project went, any changes you might have made, and how successful you've been at rooting cuttings with the cloner! Plant propagation cloners help to keep the roots hydrated which is one of the major issues with propagating plants. Have you tried to build your own plant propagation cloner?

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Growing Plants from Hardwood Cuttings

I've always been one to enjoy experimenting with plant propagation in the garden. This past weekend, since the weather was so pleasant, I went on  hardwood cutting spree.  Hardwood cuttings are very easy to do. The success rate varies quite a lot depending on the type of plants you are trying to propagate. I took around 40-50 cuttings of 4 types of Japanese maples, red trig dogwood, peach trees, viburnums, and hydrangeas. How to Make Hardwood Cuttings Taking hardwood cuttings is a very simple procedure. Just follow these general steps below and if you have questions just leave a comment in the comment section! When to Take Hardwood Cuttings: Hardwood cuttings should be taken after the plants have gone dormant which usually happens after a hard freeze.  You need a few things to get started: Container, Propagation Medium, Rooting Hormone, Sharp Pruners or Knife, Water, and of course the material…

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Propagating Grape Vines Through Greenwood Cuttings – Video

I took a short video today of some grape vine cuttings I'm attempting to root. Grape vines root easily from greenwood cuttings or from hardwood cuttings. I prefer the greenwood cutting method just because they seem to root a lot faster and I get the pleasure of faster gratification! Hopefully in about 6 weeks I'll have some rooted grape vine cuttings that I can pot up then plant this fall. Here's the video, thanks for watching!   Rooting Grape Vines from Greenwood Cuttings

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Asiatic Lily Propagation with Bulbils

Perhaps one of the easiest methods of plant propagation is through bulbils. Bulbils are simply baby plants produced along aerial stem of a plant. Lilies are well known for producing bubils and you can take advantage of this natural plant ability to create more lilies for your garden. Not all lilies produce bulbils so be observant of your garden to find out if you have any on your lilies. The bulbils in the picture below came from an Asiatic lily. This lily did not bloom this year because a deer ate the top off before it could flower. Instead it exerted its energy into creating bulbils. Bulbils form along the stem of the lily and can be harvested when they look like plump little plants with roots sticking out, somewhat resembling 'Hens and Chicks' (Sempervirens are completely unrelated to lilies). Each of these bulbils can be planted immediately in the…

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Summer Gardening Tips (Pests, Propagation, and Planning)

Summer is in full gear. Which means there is a lot to do in the garden, there always is isn't there? The tomatoes and peppers are beginning to produce and in a couple short weeks should be ready to pick. Here are a few summer gardening tips to help you in your garden. Watch for Pests Always be vigilant in the garden. Pests can appear at any time, some of which will decimate a crop in a few short hours if you aren't observant. Squash vine borers are out. I found one yesterday on a zucchini. The eggs are laid at the base of the plant and when they hatch the larvae burrow into the stem and eat they way up which eventually kills the squash plant. If you see sawdust at the base of your squash cut the stalk and kill the larvae inside. Then cover the base of…

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Propagating Plum Trees from Hardwood Cuttings

Last year my plum tree was the victim of a savage deer rubbing attack. The bark was stripped all the way around the trunk leaving no possibility of water passing toward the top of the tree through the cambium layer. It was frustrating to say the least. Two varieties of plum trees are necessary for good cross pollination to produce fruit and one of mine was doomed. Or so I thought. I took a chance and cut the plum tree down then took cuttings from the top of the plum that had not yet had time to dry out. I treated the cuttings with rooting hormone then stuck them in pots of soil. I put about 9 cuttings each in small 6 inch square nursery pots. I was in a hurry and just used whatever soil I had around at the time. I didn't expect much but figured it was…

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Propagating Grape Vines through Greenwood Cuttings

Last week I made some cuttings of my 'Concord' grape vine in an attempt to make a few more vines. Grapes are great edible plants to have in the garden whether you like eating them at the table, making juice, or even making wine.  They like a full sun location and can be bothered by several kinds of pests including the Japanese beetle.  The deer seem to have enjoyed our vines quite a bit over the years and so I've never gotten a harvest.  Hopefully this year will be different! How to Propagate Grapes from Greenwood Cuttings I took about 6 cuttings from the grape vine.  I chose cuttings that were thick enough to stand upright when stuck in my medium.  The cuttings were all greenwood which means they were relatively new growth.  If the leaves were small I left one alone and removed the rest.  If the leaves were…

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Propagating a Deciduous Magnolia Through Layering

Layering is a fantastic way to make more free plants with very little risk. Propagating a plant through layering usually involves pinning down a branch to make contact with the soil so that the branch can begin forming roots.  I've used layering to propagate more difficult to root plants like oak leaf hydrangeas.  Below you will find a short video I put together on layering a deciduous magnolia ('Jane').  It took a few months for the magnolia roots to form but as you can see in the video the layering technique was very successful. The only disadvantage to rooting a plant through layering is that you are limited in the amount of material you can produce.  That's not really a problem if you are just make a plant or two for yourself or a friend. Here you can find more information on plant propagation.  

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