Growing Plants from Hardwood Cuttings

I've always been one to enjoy experimenting with plant propagation in the garden. This past weekend, since the weather was so pleasant, I went on  hardwood cutting spree.  Hardwood cuttings are very easy to do. The success rate varies quite a lot depending on the type of plants you are trying to propagate. I took around 40-50 cuttings of 4 types of Japanese maples, red trig dogwood, peach trees, viburnums, and hydrangeas. How to Make Hardwood Cuttings Taking hardwood cuttings is a very simple procedure. Just follow these general steps below and if you have questions just leave a comment in the comment section! When to Take Hardwood Cuttings: Hardwood cuttings should be taken after the plants have gone dormant which usually happens after a hard freeze.  You need a few things to get started: Container, Propagation Medium, Rooting Hormone, Sharp Pruners or Knife, Water, and of course the material…

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Plant Propagation Guide

Here is a little guide on various plants that you can propagate in your home garden. I've included the types of propagation where I've been successful (seeds, Layering, Division, Cuttings, etc.).  If I can do it so can you! Propagating Perennials Common NameBotanical NameMethods of Propagation Artemisia 'Powis Castle'Cuttings, Layering MilkweedAsclepias incarnataCuttings, Seeds CatmintNepetaCuttings, Division, Seeds ConeflowerEchinacea purpurea, E. paradoxa, E. augustifoliaCuttings, Division, Seeds HostaDivision, Seeds (may not come true from seed) Russian SagePerovskia atriplicifoliaHardwood and Softwood Cuttings Salvia Salvia nemorosaCuttings, Seeds   Propagating Shrubs and Trees Trees and shrubs can be propagated from a variety of methods.  Always get good, clean, disease free material when taking cuttings. Common NameBotanical NameMethods of Propagation Birch (River)Betula nigraCuttings HydrangeaH. macrophylla, H. serrata Cuttings Hydrangea (Oak Leaf)Hydrangea quercifoliaCuttings, Seeds Japanese MapleAcer palmatumCuttings, Grafting, Seeds Red Twig DogwoodCornus sericea, C. alba Cuttings Viburnum 'Shasta'Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosaCuttings, Layering   Propagating Annuals Common NameBotanical NameMethods of Propagation…

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5 Shrubs to Propagate in Late Fall or Winter (Hardwood Cuttings)

We're entering the middle of November which means not only is that turkey get closer to being roasted but it's also time for hardwood cuttings!  There are quite a few plants that will easily grow from hardwood cuttings and are well worth trying for any budget minded gardener.  Free plants are always a good thing right?  Well unless they're weeds...  Anyway today we'll look at a few shrubs you can easily make more of over the winter that have high chances of success.  That's not to say you will be 100% successful but these shrubs are typically very easy to root. First though what are hardwood cuttings?  Hardwood cuttings are taken from branches that have had some time to develop a brown outer coating on the bark.  The branches have gone dormant and have dropped their leaves which allows them to focus all their energy on root development.  With hardwood…

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5 Methods to Propagate Plants!

Here's a topic I'm a huge fan of: PLANT PROPAGATION!  I've talked about it repeatedly and those of you who have followed Growing The Home Garden over the years have seen some of my plant propagation experiments.  I thought for today's Friday Five post I would highlight the various common forms of plant propagation.  I highly encourage those of you who have never tried it before to give it a go.  Some plants are very easy to propagate and nothing can beat getting free plants for your garden! Five Methods to Propagate Plants Seeds!  Seeds are one of the most popular methods of plant propagation around.  Seeds are nature's way of making more plants and sustaining the species through the diversification of genes. Every time a seed is planted there is a chance that there will be some variations in the plant's traits which could make it more adaptable to…

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Propagation Continues – Even in Winter!

On Monday while all three of my children were napping at the same time (that is a major feat!) I spent some time preparing some cuttings. Until Monday I really haven't had many opportunities to get outside and garden. The weather has been too cold and with my youngest, who doesn't seem to like taking naps during the day, I haven't been able to do much! Since the historic napping was in progress I went out to the garage to prepare some hardwood cuttings. All the cuttings were about 6-8 inches in length and all of them were treated with rooting hormone prior to sticking. There are two differences between what I did on Monday and what I usually do. First you may notice that I used a soil mixture rather than sand. Why? It was close at hand and I had more of it. It's also lighter and contains…

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Creatively Pruning a Dappled Willow

This past weekend we went to visit my wife's family. On the property they have a couple Japanese Dappled Willows ('Hiroki Nishiki') that I've taken cuttings from in the past. They are several years old and have really become large shrubs stretching over ten feet tall. Needless to say a shrub this large needs a special place and if doesn't have that special place it needs pruned. The willow needed pruned so I set about attempting to coppice the shrub. Coppicing is where you cut the shrub to within a couple inches of the ground and allow it to regrow. Usually trees that are coppiced are cut back annually but this willow never had the treatment. I started the process of coppicing but as I cut back branches I began to see a shape emerge. Two main branches that I tied together last year had formed a nice curve and…

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Rooting Viburnums from Hardwood Cuttings

Around Thanksgiving I took 6 small 4 node cuttings from a single viburnum at my in-law’s house. I don’t know what variety the viburnum but that doesn’t bother me, I can find out when the leaves begin to grow and the flowers start to bloom (which admittedly might be awhile). For now though I’ll just be happy to add six more plants to the garden. Of the six viburnums I rooted five had nice roots starting to emerge from between the bottom two nodes. As you can see in the top picture the cuttings had four nodes that I stuck in sand with two nodes under the sand. The top two nodes and maybe the third node should develop branches and leaves.   I used rooting hormone when I took the cuttings and only used sand for the medium. I kept the cuttings in a warm and humid environment (our…

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You Don’t Need Much Space to Propagate Plants

You don’t need much space to propagate plants. In fact you can propagate a bunch of plants in some very small spaces like in the containers in the picture. Together I have 5 different kinds of plants ready for rooting including red twig dogwood, rhododendron, azalea, Purple Leaf Plum Propagation, Japanese maple, and Yoshino cherry. To me it’s amazing that you can do so much with so little. All together there are 35 cuttings placed into these two small containers. I like to use containers that look nice in the house whenever I do cuttings but I have to admit more often I find myself using recycled/reused materials. Even in a small reused (washed of course) yogurt cup you can fit 5-8 cuttings. In the above picture I’ve mixed the cuttings in no particular way but it’s a good idea to try and keep cuttings separated from each other by…

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Propagation with Hardwood Cuttings

I thought I would take a moment to talk about hardwood cuttings. It is the beginning of winter and which is also a great time to go out and try to reproduce many of your favorite woody trees and shrubs in the garden. Many plants will easily propagate through hardwood cuttings and I've included a short list below that you might like to try. Hardwood cuttings root easier than softwood cuttings (at least in my experience!) So what is a hardwood cutting? It's a cutting taken from a mature branch of a woody plant usually during the late fall, winter, or early spring while the plant is dormant. How do you take a hardwood cuttings? With a sharp pair of clean pruners cut a mature section of your specimen with at least 3 nodes. That is a general guideline I use and it seems to work pretty well. The best…

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