How Time Passes In My Garden

The passage of time is an amazing thing, especially so when applied to the garden. To me the passage of time in the garden involves three different dynamics: time over long periods, through the seasons, and how you spend time in the garden. The first dynamic is not as easy to see as the other two and unless you have documented the garden through pictures you might not really notice how much things have changed. Take my birdbath garden for example. This is how it began, very simple and small and over the years it has grown considerably. A birdbath and a few pass-alongs mixed with purchased plants made a nice little spot for the birds to take a dip or a drink. This was back in October of 2007 around the time when I started this blog. Seven months later in June of 2008 the garden had grown in…

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Send Me Your Shed!

OK, not really, I know the postage would be expensive! Still I want to see your shed or greenhouse photos. I'm looking for ideas and inspiration to build one of my own eventually and would love to have some sheds to share here on The Home Garden. If you would like to contribute a shed or greenhouse photo of your shed just send it to TheHomeGarden@gmail.com and I'll put it together into a post to highlight all the unique sheds. Please include information about your shed including how you use it, how it was built, size, what you like about it, what you would do differently, and anything else you would like to say! Shed pictures may not appear right away but will eventually make it to the blog and I'll be sure to let you know when it's about to appear. So go out in the garden right now…

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Growing The Fall Vegetable Garden

As I mentioned in a previous post about fall vegetable gardening we're in the window of opportunity for getting those fall veggies going. All those cool season vegetables you planted for spring are eligible for a second go round in the garden. In our garden the radishes are rising, the sugar snap peas are sown, and everything else is will be green and growing soon. It's all been planted and all that is left to do is to continue the weeding, monitor the watering, and to tolerate the waiting. I did alter my fall vegetable planting layout slightly. I was forced to change my bean area to a 2 foot by 4 foot section rather than the 1 foot by 4 foot section in the layout. Part of the reason was to make more beans for freezing but I do have to admit I forgot my layout when I was…

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Rooting Arrowwood Viburnum (Viburnum dentatum)

Arrowwood viburnum (Viburnum dentatum) is one of my favorite shrubs (among too many to list) for good reason! It's easy to grow, it's dark glossy leaves change to various colors in red hues during the fall, and it provides nourishment in the form of berries for our local avian population. This variety is called 'Morton', a 'Northern Burgundy®' viburnum which is named for its fall color. The viburnum berries began forming in late June, turned blue at the beginning of August and completely disappeared a few days later. You can thank our Mockingbird neighbors for that! I like this shrub so much that it will come as no surprise to you that I propagated more, which I'm sure will please the birds as well as myself. Viburnum Propagation The viburnum propagation process can be done in a couple ways: layering or cuttings. When layering take a low hanging branch and…

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The Birdbath Garden August Expansion

August isn't really the best time to expand a garden. It's hot, not much water, and usually the nurseries don't have a whole lot of nice plants to choose from since they are waiting on the fall stock to arrive. Even though I wouldn't recommend buying and planting plants right now if you promise the plants that you will water them when needed and won't be leaving them for any extended lengths of time then they may allow you to plant them. Such is the case with my new friend 'Diablo' (Physocarpus opulifolius). Diablo is a ninebark and a pretty neat one at that! Ninebark is native to North American and has white flowers in the summer.  Because I purchased this ninebark impulsively (I've wanted one for a while and just found a nursery nearby that sold them) I spent a few days figuring out where to put it. I…

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One Way to Protect a Small Plant from Rabbits

In our newly formed back garden areas I've planted several things that are virtually rabbit proof. Things like caryopteris and Russian sage are perfect plantings here since the rabbits just don't like them. But what do you do if you want to plant something that the rabbits believe is a deliriously delicious and divine delicacy for dinner? You have to find a way to protect it, disguise it, hide it or just not plant it. Usually the plants that are rabbit munchies I hide among the less tasty plants but recently I planted two crape myrtles that I grew from cuttings. They are small plants but have adequate root systems to grow in the garden on their own. Eventually these two plants will form an arc over a passage to what will one day be the back shade garden. While the rabbits may never even see or smell these two…

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Alas It’s Dead, My ‘Husker’s Red’

Every gardener experiences loss. In fact some gardeners experience more loss than others but eventually no matter what kind of gardener you are (experienced or not) you will lose a plant. Sometimes the plant fades away and you don't even notice it disappeared until later when you think "Didn't I have a [insert whatever plant name you like] here?" Often you will forget about it over the winter and in the spring they just don't come back and then sometimes they fade so fast that they leave a gaping hole in the garden. Prepare yourself, if you've never lost a plant either you're blessed, lucky, or you raise plastic plants! Recently one of my 'Husker's Red' Penstemons took a turn for the worse. It tanked. It was all very sudden. I don't think it felt any pain but its loss will be felt in the Japanese maple garden. So what…

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A Beautiful August Weekend!

What a beautiful fall preview weekend we were granted this weekend! This fall has been very unusual with moderate to cool temperatures here in Tennessee. I hope you we're able to enjoy the weekend outdoors, I know I did! Here's a couple pictures I took of the nice weather.   The wild goldenrod on our slope will soon be blooming which will signify the beginning of the end of summer. Soon the beginning of fall will be here with fall colors starting to change all over the northern hemisphere. This would be a good time to mention the Fall Color Project! Last year I invited all bloggers (garden or otherwise) to show the colors of nature all around them. So many people participated that we were able to see colors from all over North America and Europe. The goal was to track the spectacular color changes as they travel south. I'll…

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A Plant I Didn’t Even Know I Had

Have you ever been given a plant and you were told it was something then it turned out to be something else completely different? That happened to me back at the plant swap this spring. I was given several pots of 'Black and Blue' Salvia that day and didn't look at any of them very closely. I was in a hurry when I planted all the plants I brought home (which must have been more than two dozen) and planted plants as quickly as I could. Then I forgot about them and they began to grow.Later I noticed that this one plant in particular looked very different from what it was "supposed to be." They were all seedlings when I adopted them and as seedlings looked vaguely similar but as they grew the leaves changed. Then the salvias began blooming while the other plant was still all foliage. A couple…

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