A Temporary Way to Fix a Gravel Driveway Drainage Issue

A couple months ago we finally found and purchased land to build a new home and (of course) new gardens. No matter what property you have there will always be imperfections that need to be addressed in some way. One of the biggest problems with our property is the driveway. It's a LONG driveway that is approximately 1000' before you get to the main property. In my mind this is a feature and not a problem. It puts our home and bulk of the land behind other large acre properties which will give us privacy from the road. The actual problem with the driveway is with the very front entrance to the driveway. It's a gravel driveway with a steep entry from the main road. When it rains the gravel begins to wash away so I needed to come up with way to a fix a gravel driveway drainage issue.…

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Making A Dry Creek Bed Drainage Canal for Downspouts

What to do with this sedum garden? That's a question we asked ourselves several times. It was at one time a sedum garden but for some reason most of the sedum died over last summer. They may have been too wet, too dry, or both! The gutter from the garage roof gushes out water from at least 50% of the roof - then the summer heat dries out the whole area. It really takes one tough plant to survive those ever changing conditions. So we have to adapt and make the area more hospitable for planting. What did we come up with? A dry creek bed with a canal to channel the water away from the house and the garden. The rest of the post will tell you about making a dry creek bed! Making a Dry Creek Bed The Plan for Making a Dry Creek Bed Here's the basic…

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Finding Decorative Solutions to Drainage Problems

Last week I put together another downspout dry creek bed to help escort the water away from the house foundation. We don't really have any issues with too much moisture around the house but it's better to think preemptively and solve those dilemmas before problems arise. Besides this is such an easy project to do that it can be started and finished within 30 minutes. This is the second downspout dry creek bed I've put in this year and it only involves a three steps. Direct the water down the pathway by digging a trench a little deeper than you need it. Lay a plastic layer over the trench to keep water flowing away from the house. Cover with stone. I used a combination of gathered limestone and pea gravel. After the pea gravel I edged it with the other stones and made patterns. Toward the middle I placed on…

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When it Rains it…

Pours, and pours, and pours, and pours, and pours to a total of 6 inches of rain within 48 hours. And there is more to come! I have never seen this much rain in such a short period of time since we moved to this house.  During one period within 45 minutes we received more than 2 inches of rain. Way too much rain to come at once. I like the rain spread out over multiple days to eventually reach the same amount, definitely not a deluge. At one point I was beginning to consider building an ark. What made the flooding worse was that the ground was already completely saturated from several days of intermittent rain. So how bad is it? Take a look at our own personal monsoon. Here's where the flooding of our yard began, in the street. The rain follows a drain pipe into our neighbor's…

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How to Make a Dry Creek Bed for Downspout Drainage

The other day I just happened to have some extra stone that I had bought a few weeks ago on a large palette with some miscellaneous landscaping supplies. I thought that a dry creek bed might look better than the cheap looking plastic tube that was attached to the end of the downspout so I started putting one together using those stones. It took about 4 partially filled bags of stone and a little landscape fabric to complete. It's a simple enough project to complete in 30 to 40 minutes. First I cut landscape fabric to fit the area. Landscape fabric is good for this use since it is porous and will prevent weeds from underneath. It won't stop weeds that blow in so future weedings will be necessary. I made a triangular shape for the part closest to the house then overlapped other pieces of fabric toward the outside…

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The Rain Garden

Here you can find links to my posts about building a rain garden.The First Step to RecoveryDigging the Rain GardenWorking on the Rain GardenThe Rain Garden is Almost DonePlanting the Rain Garden(still to come)

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The Rain Garden is Almost Done

The rain garden is very close to being finished. We worked most of the day and managed to get the soil put in to make the planting bed. All that is left to do is to select plants and cover with mulch!Here's a look at today's progress:Here is where I ended the other evening. A big hole with a trench. The picture is a little dark but you can still make out the trench for the water leading to the rain garden area itself.The next step was to make the hole larger and create a trench parallel to the driveway to serve as a water collecting trench. Then we laid a piece of perforated drain pipe in the parallel trench. Before we laid the pipe we put gravel down in the trench. The gravel helps to improve the drainage and allows for better water flow.Here is the expanded rain garden…

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On Today’s Agenda: Working on the Rain Garden

Here's just a quick list of what needs done with the rain garden in chronological order. 1) Finish excavation: I need to expand the "Big Dig" to its final size. I'm not 100% sure how much bigger I'll make it but I want to shape into more of a curve. I also need to finish excavating the channel parallel to the driveway. 2) Go get the gravel: We need to run to Beasley's (our local stone, mulch, and dirt dealer) to pick up a truckload of limestone gravel. 3) Lay a 2" layer of gravel in the channels and in the rain garden area: For drainage. 4) Lay the perforated piping: We will put the piping into a "T" shape. One piece will go in the parallel channel and will connect with a "T piece." Then the "T" piece will connect with the channel that goes to the rain garden.…

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Digging the Rain Garden

Thanks for guessing at my post the other day called Digging a Hole. Creative title right? Nan of Gardening Gone Wild, Tina of In the Garden and Gloria of Pollinators-Welcome all guessed right, it's a rain garden. Our driveway is a slope and at the bottom of it is an area that collects and pools water after each rain. Rain gardens are a good solution for dealing with water runoff problems. They help to filter out the chemicals that run off our streets and driveways before the water enters our water supply. To do this rain garden I'll need to construct a French Drain. If you would like to look back I mentioned the French drain I was planning on building in my post called The First Step to Recovery... That post also contains a picture of the drainage issue.To review briefly I'll place a layer of gravel in the…

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The First Step to Recovery…

The first step to recovery is recognizing that you have a problem. We sure do, its our drainage! We sit below the road in our cul-de-sac and while drainage is generally good for our house, our driveway pools water near the garage. It's mostly just an annoyance. When its rained heavily you have to step through a mud puddle to get into the car, usually it doesn't require scuba gear. I have a plan though: A modified French drain.Along the edge of the driveway I plan to dig a trench, as long as the puddle is wide and deep enough that a perforated drain tube can be placed in it. The drain will then attach to another tube that leads out into the yard through another trench. At the end of the second trench will be a water receiving area partially filled with gravel. Once all the tubes are in…

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